Legalization BC CAMCD

CAMCD’s Provincial Submission On Legalization

Submission Of The Canadian Association Of Medical Cannabis Dispensaries To The BC Cannabis Legalization And Regulation Secretariat November 1, 2017 A “Made In BC” Solution for Cannabis Regulation   Established in 2010, the Canadian Association of Medical Dispensaries (CAMCD), is a non-profit, trade organization representing over 60 medical cannabis dispensaries in Canada. Member dispensaries provide […]

The Cannabis Act Submission To The Standing Committee On Public Health

The Canadian Association of Medical Cannabis Dispensaries issued its official response to the Standing Committee on Public Health regarding Bill C-45 also known as “the Cannabis Act”.

Transitioning Canada’s Cannabis Industry.Brief

While there are many issues to discuss with government regarding the Cannabis Act, CAMCD felt that the priority must be to ensure that storefront dispensaries are included in the new regulated regime to ensure no adverse impact to public health (continuity of access) and to the thousands of jobs currently maintained within the cannabis economy.  Without inclusion in the new regulated environment there CAMCD feels there is no point in addressing other subjects related to distribution.

Lobbying by special interest groups intended to discredit dispensary services and ban them from the future regulated cannabis distribution economy has been ongoing for some time now.  CAMCD hopes that submissions like these can help educate lawmakers and public policy groups and provide them with an evidence based approach to why existing dispensaries should have a place in the new regulatory framework.

 

 

testing bc marijuana camcd

Cannabis Dispensaries to Set Up Their Own Testing System

Blocked from the federal medical marijuana testing system, dispensaries are creating their own

 

VANCOUVER— The Canadian Association of Medical Cannabis Dispensaries (CAMCD) is moving to set up testing standards and protocols to ensure the safety of the cannabis member dispensaries are selling.

Association President Jeremy Jacob says, “We believe consumers should be empowered to make educated choices about the cannabis products they buy, so we are moving to set up a rigorous, independent and transparent cannabis testing system.”

CAMCD promotes a regulated community-based approach to cannabis access with member dispensaries across Canada serving over 150,000 consumers.

Store front cannabis dispensaries are not allowed to test their product through federally licensed laboratories. Jacob says CAMCD is setting up its own testing standards after federally licensed medical marijuana producers recalled cannabis contaminated with the chemicals bifenazate and myclobutanil in November and December 2016, and were slow to inform the public.

“Dispensary clients need to know the product is free of contaminants. Consumers should be able to see testing results,” says Jacob. “Some of our member dispensaries are already testing their product privately, but we need a system where all are able to test their product, the labs are independent, and the consumer can rely on the results.”

The CAMCD board has created a working group with dispensary owners, cannabis producers, processors, and lab owners, to create guidelines and structure for the testing program. The board wants the system to be in place by May 2017.

 

Association President Jeremy Jacob will be available for questions today at 4:30 PST

Media Contact:
Jeremy Jacob (604) 317-5759

Study Shows Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Traffic Deaths

University of Colorado Denver

A groundbreaking new study shows that laws legalizing medical marijuana have resulted in a nearly nine percent drop in traffic deaths and a five percent reduction in beer sales.

“Our research suggests that the legalization of medical marijuana reduces traffic fatalities through reducing alcohol consumption by young adults,” said Daniel Rees, professor of economics at the University of Colorado Denver who co-authored the study with D. Mark Anderson, assistant professor of economics at Montana State University.

The researchers collected data from a variety of sources including the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and the Fatality Analysis Reporting System.

The study is the first to examine the relationship between the legalization of medical marijuana and traffic deaths.

“We were astounded by how little is known about the effects of legalizing medical marijuana,” Rees said. “We looked into traffic fatalities because there is good data, and the data allow us to test whether alcohol was a factor.”

Anderson noted that traffic deaths are significant from a policy standpoint.

“Traffic fatalities are an important outcome from a policy perspective because they represent the leading cause of death among Americans ages five to 34,” he said.

The economists analyzed traffic fatalities nationwide, including the 13 states that legalized medical marijuana between 1990 and 2009. In those states, they found evidence that alcohol consumption by 20- through 29-year-olds went down, resulting in fewer deaths on the road.

The economists noted that simulator studies conducted by previous researchers suggest that drivers under the influence of alcohol tend to underestimate how badly their skills are impaired. They drive faster and take more risks. In contrast, these studies show that drivers under the influence of marijuana tend to avoid risks. However, Rees and Anderson cautioned that legalization of medical marijuana may result in fewer traffic deaths because it’s typically used in private, while alcohol is often consumed at bars and restaurants.

“I think this is a very timely study given all the medical marijuana laws being passed or under consideration,” Anderson said. “These policies have not been research-based thus far and our research shows some of the social effects of these laws. Our results suggest a direct link between marijuana and alcohol consumption.”

The study also examined marijuana use in three states that legalized medical marijuana in the mid-2000s, Montana, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Marijuana use by adults increased after legalization in Montana and Rhode Island, but not in Vermont. There was no evidence that marijuana use by minors increased.

Opponents of medical marijuana believe that legalization leads to increased use of marijuana by minors.

According to Rees and Anderson, the majority of registered medical marijuana patients in Arizona and Colorado are male. In Arizona, 75 percent of registered patients are male; in Colorado, 68 percent are male. Many are under the age of 40. For instance, 48 percent of registered patients in Montana are under 40.

“Although we make no policy recommendations, it certainly appears as though medical marijuana laws are making our highways safer,” Rees said.

Read more: http://www.sciencenewsline.com/psychology/2011112917200019.html